We Begin Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch!

Care to see the beginning cutscenes or gameplay features of Level 5’s wonderful JRPG ? Tune in then! There’s even more where that came from.

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Keep Your Friends Close, And Your Enemies Closer. Unless It’s Tricky, Because He’ll Breathe Fire On You.

Link Cable is a Let’s Play with two friends who are avid game design enthusiasts. Feel free to Like, Comment or Subscribe to our channel for frequent video game related content!

We Encounter A Pal for Life In The Last Legs of Journey

Link Cable is a Let’s Play with two friends who are avid game design enthusiasts. Feel free to Like, Comment or Subscribe to our channel for frequent video game related content!

We Continue Our Journey To Take Back Torchlight In This Episode of Link Cable

Link Cable is a Let’s Play with two friends who are avid game design enthusiasts. Feel free to Like, Comment or Subscribe to our channel for frequent video game related content!

Pikmin 2, Episode 4 – Link Cable

This game is depressing sometimes.

Let’s Talk About: Why You Should Play WoW In Slow-Motion

Image credit: Blizzard

World of Warcraft is a game that I used to play rather regularly during 2008-2011. As a college student, it was basically the equivalent of my entire entertainment budget since I don’t have the cash to afford new systems, or a better computer to keep playing new games. It was basically the most convenient way to spend my downtime when I wasn’t stressing out about projects. I enjoy a lot about the game, but one thing I noticed towards the end of my last active playing cycle is that after a while I started to become disconnected with the game. I did enjoy PvP, raiding (for a brief time period) and questing, but after playing for so long I started to know exactly what the game was throwing at me at all times. The only aspects of the game that I’d really get a rush were in the dynamic areas such as PvP, and even then I had such tunnel vision I forgot to question whether or not I was having fun anymore.

After a while WoW just becomes a chore, but only one that you sort of enjoy doing. I stopped because I grew more and more self-aware of just how much I had to force myself to care (plus I was now more aware with how flawed some systems were, more on that another time,) and by that time I really wanted to play other games. That was last summer, and recently I started playing again because I wanted to give it another shot, but before I re-subbed I took the time to question why I wanted to come back and how I could make the most of the experience without just falling into the same traps I had before.

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Let’s Talk About: How Portal 2’s Music Sums Up The Creative Process

Portal 2 SoundtrackVideo game music, or what my girlfriend lovingly describes as “bleep” music, is a larger part of my iTunes Library than anything else. I listen to it constantly, that means every day, and for many years. This has led to some awkward moments in high school when my friends and I, who were all sitting around a table in the cafeteria, would talk about music, and one person who eventually ask, “So Joe, what kind of music do you listen to?” to which I would have to give the blanket statement of “Anything that sounds good.” Sometimes they’d ask to see my music library on my iPod, so I would (begrudgingly) and wait for their confusion and then to ask me why I listen to Japanese guys and Mario.

Anyway, repressed high school memories aside, I never see myself listening to any less of the music from the games I love. They seem to always inspire me in some way, whether it is creatively or not. And lately I’ve been noticing how I connect to the Portal 2’s soundtrack whilst I work on whatever it is I have to do. I’m not talking about the entire soundtrack, or what the game is even about here, but three songs in general, found on volume 2. You’re probably familiar with them, though nobody really likes to bring them up from what I’ve noticed.

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Design and Beauty: My experience.

JoeI’ve only considered myself a professional designer (that is, print/web design) for about two years, when I was deep in my major and could actually produce good work and defend my reasons as to why it was the right choice.

During that time I learned that for all the time I have spent worrying about how a design looks, I’d get past the point of having a purpose for my decisions which led to a design that wasn’t as exciting. Sure, you can craft a solid composition with decorative typography and color, but without any solid concept it’s just going to come across as superflous. Don’t get me wrong though, I think that plenty of designs can look good an convey a message well, but I’m saying that when a person hires you they’ll likely have a vision in mind already, and even if they don’t they’ll more than likely want to change a couple of things.

Ultimately every person in business doing creative work has to make compromises to be successful. This doesn’t mean that you canot be creative with your work, it just means that you’re thinking about other people (specifically the client and their target audience) over yourself, which is our biggest marketable trait. As a designer, I’ve learned to think outside of the box and really enjoy doing so. I don’t mind not being able to blow their minds with the best-looking design ever, I’m way more interested in pitching a concept that they would likely have not thought of. Otherwise they wouldn’t be coming to me.

To me, design isn’t about just giving you something nice to look at anymore, it’s more of a philosophy. A philosophy that extends way beyond your Adobe Creative Suite and across multiple careers. Whether it’s magazines, the web, games, home interiors, fashion, engineering etc, if you’re thinking about user experiences and the best way of conveying a function naturally, then you’re a designer. Congratulations! You’re one of the great thinkers of your time, here to make life more efficient and better-looking for the rest of us, but more as a byproduct than a catalyst.

-Joe